Tag Archives: Joshua L. Chamberlain

Appomattox Road: “A heavy blow struck me just above the left breast” — Joshua Chamberlain at Quaker Road

  The end was approaching. By late March 1865, “we felt sure that he (Ulysses Simpson Grant) was preparing some great movement, and this must be still to the left, to cut [Robert E.] Lee’s communications and envelop his existing lines,” said Brig. Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, commander of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 5th […]

Appomattox Road: Cavalry fight at Dinwiddie – Part I: “The sharp, heavy volleys heard over the hill”

  Sent to capture an obscure Southside Virginia crossroads in late March 1865, Phil Sheridan botched the assignment — and the 1st Maine Cavalry Regiment saved him from an embarrassing defeat. Ulysses Simpson Grant sent Sheridan to make an end run around the left flank of Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia. […]

Meet the Heroes of Evergreen Cemetery: Part II

  Approximately 1,400 Civil War veterans — I call them “heroes,” if only because they fought to preserve our country — lie buried at Evergreen Cemetery on Stevens Avenue in Portland. On a recent sunny, warm summer’s day, Friends of Evergreen docent Lin Brown introduced me to about 50 of them. We toured the 239-acre […]

20th Maine survivors hugged Mother Earth at Fredericksburg

Orders sent Col. Adelbert Ames, Lt. Col. Joshua Chamberlain, and the 20th Maine Infantry up the body-strewn slope of Marye’s Heights in late afternoon on Saturday, Dec. 13, 1862. Orders and Confederate bullets kept the surviving Maine boys there until early Monday, Dec. 15. During the human slaughter known as Fredericksburg, Union troops repeatedly ascended […]

Isabella Fogg investigated reports of Army mistreatment of wounded Union soldiers

    Isabella Fogg had already encountered the horrors of war when the slaughter known as Antietam took place on Sept. 17, 1862. Then Fogg discovered the hell that is war. Surnamed Morrison, her parents had emigrated to New Brunswick from Scotland before Isabella’s birth in 1823. Practically a child bride when she married William […]

“Put me in, Coach, I’m ready to play today”

When the Civil War Centennial began in spring 1961, we lived on Beacon Street in Brewer. Then as now a dead-end street, Beacon had no claim to fame. But our home stood on our grandparents’ farm, and they lived on Chamberlain Street. Named for Joshua L. Chamberlain, Brewer’s most famous denizen, the name meant little […]