Tag Archives: Sarah Sampson

Help save 17 acres at Camp Letterman hospital site in Gettysburg: Part II

  Maine has a real serious connection with the lonely Medical Department monument alongside Route 30 (York Pike) at Gettysburg. As explained last week in http://maineatwar.bangordailynews.com/2017/02/01/help-save-17-acres-at-camp-letterman-hospital-site-in-gettysburg-part-i/, the monument stands near the road built to access Camp Letterman, the large field hospital established in late July 1863 to care for soldiers too seriously wounded to be […]

Calais nurse cared for her patients even as Confederates advanced on Savage Station — Part II

As the ill Corp. Harrison Huckins of Eastport and Co. K, 6th Maine Infantry Regiment battled for his life inside a hospital tent on Sunday, June 29, 1862, he could hear the enemy coming. Describing himself as “being very sick with the Typhoid Fever,” Huckins lay in a tent at Savage Station, a whistle stop […]

George McClellan abandons his sick and wounded at Savage Station — Part I

Like a bullet-crippled Custer trooper watching Indian warriors approach him at the Little Big Horn battlefield, what did Corp. Harrison Huckins think as he watched Confederate soldiers walk toward him at Savage Station in Virginia on Monday, June 30, 1862? The Custer trooper knew the Indians were coming to kill him; did a similar thought […]

Sarah Sampson hurtled three stairwells and the Secretary of State to meet President Abraham Lincoln

  Neither the weariness of her all-night vigil caring for wounded soldiers nor social propriety kept a demure Bath nurse from making her self-appointed introduction to President Abraham Lincoln — — and nor could Secretary of State William Seward. When Oliver Otis Howard took the 3rd Maine Infantry Regiment to Washington, D.C. in early June […]

A wild flower collected from a soldier’s grave

  Fifty-eight years before the first Armistice Day observance in the United States, a compassionate Bath nurse visited the grave of a young Maine soldier in Washington, D.C. Sarah Sampson also ensured that a brigadier general would not forget John W. Campbell, who had fought in one battle before losing his life. Hailing from Livermore, […]

Sarah Sampson could have made photographic history

  How close did Sarah Sampson come to making photographic history? Born in 1832, Sarah married Charles Sampson in 1855. The childless couple lived in Bath, where Charles sculpted ships’ figureheads. When patriotic fervor ran high along the Kennebec River in spring 1861, he joined the 3rd Maine Infantry Regiment, accepted a captain’s commission, and […]