Category Archives: Maine’s role

Blood-letting at Salem Church

The regimental ranks thinned by 18 men in mid-morning on Sunday, May 3, 1863, the 5th Maine Infantry boys may have figured the fighting was over for the day. For them, the blood-letting had scarcely begun. After Union regiments captured Marye’s Heights that day, orders summoned Col. Clark S. Edwards and the 5th Maine to […]

Death dance with a Confederate cannonball

After enjoying the “beautiful night” that slipped away with the dawn on May 3, 1863, 1st Lt. George Bicknell saw that Sunday turn decidedly ugly. Sheltered by the Virginia darkness, he stood with his 5th Maine Infantry comrades as they waited the orders to attack nearby Confederate troops defending the heights southeast of Fredericksburg. As […]

Travel agent

Lagrange Severance showed promise as a fledgling travel agent … despite the faded blue uniform that he donned daily. When Col. George Shepley led the 12th Maine Infantry to war in November 1861, the delightfully named Lagrange marched along as a private in Co. H. Described by a Bangor newspaper as “a very intelligent young […]

Introducing Maine at War

Of all recent “Civil War” movies, only “Gettysburg” captured national attention. Its historical predecessor and cinematic prequel, “Gods and Generals,” bombed at the theater, probably because the film crews spent too much time “shooting” in Southern parlors and not in the military camps. Other Civil War-themed films, especially those wretchedly scripted for TV, also bombed. […]